By betsy On Friday, April 23 rd, 2010 · no Comments · In

I have always maintained that admissions officers are getting more and more transparent. And that’s a good thing. Many admissions officers are regular bloggers; I’ve linked to the Chicago Booth School’s director of admissions Rose Martinelli several times. She has often written thoughtful posts on the substance and process of MBA applications. I’m a big fan. Other admissions officers are regular Twitter fans – I follow MJ Shores of UCLA Anderson and always find her insightful and useful. Wharton’s robust Engage website offers student-led Q&A, blogs, links, and more.

Dartmouth’s Tuck has gone one step further. Not to dismiss their excellent student blogs, but the Admissions office has done one better: they are putting on their own workshop on filling out applications (wait, isn’t that my job as an admissions consultant?). Scheduled for May 14, Tuck Admissions is putting on a workshop designed to help students with the application process. What a great idea! Better than an online chat, but a great way to get the feel for the school and to hear directly from admissions board members about what they are looking for in an application. Each school is different, indeed, but this event will help you get your brain wrapped around those questions and will give you insights from those who will be making the decisions next winter. For more information, please email Cameron.Steese@tuck.dartmouth.edu with a request for an invitation.

To get you inspired, I’ve posted Tuck’s questions for the most recent application cycle:

1. Why is an MBA a critical next step toward your short- and long-term career goals? Why is Tuck the best MBA program for you? (If you are applying for a joint or dual degree, please explain how the additional degree will contribute to those goals.)

2. Tuck defines leadership as “inspiring others to strive and enabling them to accomplish great things.” We believe great things and great leadership can be accomplished in pursuit of business and societal goals. Describe a time when you exercised such leadership. Discuss the challenges you faced and the results you achieved. What characteristics helped you to be effective, and what areas do you feel you need to develop in order to be a better leader?

3. Discuss the most difficult constructive criticism or feedback you have received. How did you address it? What have you learned from it?

4. Tuck seeks candidates of various backgrounds who can bring new perspectives to our community. How will your unique personal history, values, and/or life experiences contribute to the culture at Tuck?

Dartmouth Tuck School