Archive | Uncategorized

MBA Recruiting Events

Please note that this list is not exhaustive. Please note also that HBS has already come and gone.

SCHOOL DATE TIME REGISTRATION & MORE INFO

Columbia 9/8 6:30 – 8:30 California Rm, Westin St. Francis, SF
Stanford GSB 9/14 6 – 8 pm Gap HQ, 2 Folsom Street, SF
Dartmouth Tuck 9/17 7 – 9 pm The Stanford Court Hotel, SF
Northwestern Kellogg 9/17 6.30 pm PGE HQ, 245 Market St., SF
Chicago Booth 9/24 7 – 9 pm PGE HQ, 245 Market St., SF
Yale 9/24 6 – 8 pm Grand Hyatt Union Square, SF
Wharton 9/28 6:30 – 8:30 Wharton SF, 101 Howard St., SF
Wharton Palo Alto 9/24
Michigan Ross 9/29 7 – 9 pm Club Quarters, San Francisco
MIT Sloan 10/7 7 – 9 pm SF Marriott, 55 4th St., SF
MIT Sloan Palo Alto 10/8
NYU Stern 10/26 7 – 9 pm TBA check NYU site
UVA Darden 11/11 TBA TBA check Darden site.
Haas Full Time 11/19 7 – 9 pm Wells Fargo HQ, 420 Montgomery St., SF
Haas Evening & WE 9/10 6 – 7:30 pm Palace Hotel, 2 New Montgomery, SF

The MBA Tour

One of the ways to clarify your own part in the admissions process is to know which b-school you want and why. Yes, research, research, and more research.
A good way to find out about school programs (and how they are differentiating themselves) is by going to an event like the MBA Tour www.thembatour.com, coming to a city near you! I’ll be attending the San Francisco event on Sept. 27

•MBA Panel Presentations: Cover all your basic MBA application questions before speaking one on one with reps,
•Individual School Presentations: Easily compare schools and match your interests to program options,
•Open Fair: Meet one on one with admission directors and alumni,
•Participating Schools: Wharton, Berkeley, UCLA, Cornell, Duke, Michigan (Global), NYU Stern, Carnegie Mellon, UNC, Indiana, Vanderbilt, Emory, Yale, HEC Paris, ESADE & many more!

USA September Tour 2009
•Houston: Sept 3, Hilton Houston Post Oak, 2001 Post Oak Bvld, Houston, TX 77056
•Chicago: Sept 8, Swissotel Chicago, 323 E Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60601
•Atlanta: Sept 10 Hyatt Regency Atlanta, 265 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
•New York City: Sept 12, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers, 811 7th Avenue, New York 10019
•Boston: Sept 13, Taj Boston Hotel, 15 Arlington Street, Boston, MA 02116
•Washington DC: Sept 20, Grand Hyatt Washington, 1000 H Street, NW, Washington DC 20001
•Los Angeles: Sept 26, Wilshire Grand Hotel, 930 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90017
•San Francisco: Sept 27, Grand Hyatt San Francisco, 345 Stockton Street, San Francisco 94108

Visit www.TheMBATour.com for full event schedules and registration

Chicago Admissions Director Nails It

Rose Martinelli, head of admissions at the Chicago Booth Business School, just posted an insightful piece about the MBA admissions process on her blog. Admissions committee members are increasingly transparent about what they are looking for. No matter what school you are applying to: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Chicago, or any other, her words ring true:

In the midst of all the preparations to apply for business school – studying for the GMAT, researching schools, drafting essays (and trying to keep up with your regular life) — it’s very easy to forget about the importance of taking some time for reflection. Here’s an excerpt:

“There are many tools you can use to help facilitate your self assessment process, but one of the simplest is creating a timeline and inserting points of importance on that timeline (whether good or bad) that were critical to your development. Don’t limit your reflection to work and school alone, but expand it to your interests, passions and community. Once you have completed this, go back and reflect on each point – What did you learn? How have you changed? Etc. The goal is to gain an understanding of your history so that you can build upon it as you pursue the next phase in your life. This process should also help you come up with the “whys” behind your decision to go back to school and which degree may be right for you.”


The Rose Report

The Dreaded GMAT

I’m no fan of the Graduate Management Admission Test, the GMAT. It’s a tricky, exasperating standardized test that sorts MBA aspirants into two categories: Those that have to worry about their scores and those that don’t.

Critics proclaim that the test doesn’t measure success in business or business school and that the format (or content, or delivery, or something…) unfairly challenges certain groups of test takers. I won’t take the other side of that argument, because they may be right.

The Graduate Management Admissions Council, the power behind the GMAT, argues that the test is predictive and does give schools a uniform method for measuring applicants. They also may be right.

Whether admissions officers agree with the results or efficacy of the test, it is here to stay.*

You are the Customer
A number of very good test-prep companies offer materials, classes and/or one-on-one coaching. I strongly urge you to take advantage of their offerings, and I have great news for you: As the potential client, you are in the driver’s seat.

Kaplan, Manhattan GMAT, Princeton Review, Veritas, and the super-tutors at Inspirica are just some of your options. There are other specialized companies in different locales (India sports a slew of cool tutoring programs), and you can find freelance consultants in most major cities.

Because the test and its outcome (not to mention the financial and time commitment) are so important, you should put on your consumer hat and look for the best deal for you.

Finding the Right Trainer
A few days ago, I accompanied an aspiring MBA applicant to a free class given by one particular vendor. A few things struck me about my prospective learning experience. At first, I couldn’t understand the teacher because he talked too fast. But I figured I could get over that, and I eventually figured out how to follow his verbal pace. But the problem was that he was such a great test-taker—and so were all the other potential instructors—that I felt like my teacher was a different species than me.

Frankly, I am intimidated by people that test off the charts. I am never going to be like them. My brain works in a different way. What’s plain as day to them is not plain as day to me. They’ve never had the personal experience of looking at a problem and drawing a complete blank.**
I’m going to stick my neck out here and say that a teacher doesn’t have to score a perfect 800 to help a student get what they want. You may want the people who develop the tests to have gotten a perfect score; that’s great. But I don’t know if the person in front of me teaching my class, or tutoring me one-to-one needs to be such a genius.

I recommend attending a number of free seminars, and even if you are in a major city with lots of test schools, go online and see how a virtual course works. You are the consumer. You have a choice and not every teacher is the right fit for you. Remember, test companies are businesses competing with each other. It is their job to tell you why you should work with them. You are the client, and you have every right to find an instructor and a course structure that fits your style and your needs.

You have to find a teacher that speaks your language. Someone that knows what your goals are. The teacher I saw kept talking about scoring in the 99th percentile, or about 780. If that’s what sells prep courses, I can understand the emphasis on near-perfect scores. But you don’t need to get a 780. In fact, you may not need to break a 700.

Just Get it Over the Net
Schools publish average or median scores, but as anyone with a rudimentary understanding of statistics knows, those numbers don’t tell you the whole story. Look at the middle 80% of what students are getting. For example, the middle 80% at Chicago was 660-760 (ranked in the top 5) and the middle 80% at NYU Stern was also 660-760 (ranked top 10). The middle 80% at the University of Washington was 640-750 (ranked top 35). Get the picture?

You simply need to do well enough so the GMAT isn’t an issue. I like to think it’s like tennis: you need to get it over the net. You want a good, solid score. The goal, especially for those of us who aren’t great test-takers, is to figure how to make it so the whole process doesn’t intimidate you. You don’t need a scary-smart teacher. The test is intimidating enough as it is.

Like everything else with the MBA application, it’s better to start early so you are, as Milton Friedman would say, Free to Choose. Some classroom courses are given only every two months, so if you want to take the test before October, you may need to sign up for a course before it gets away from you. GOOD LUCK!

* Some schools now accept the GRE, or Graduate Record Exam, in lieu of the GMAT. In either case, students can benefit from prep courses and/or tutoring.
** I took the test awhile ago, and since graduating from Harvard Business School (got slightly below the median for my entering class), completely forgot everything I had to learn for the test. So it was as if I was starting afresh when I went to the prep class.